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Hope

Isaiah 40:1-11

Hope is in short supply right now. Increased unemployment. Home repossessions threatening to hit 1991 records. Banks, the backbone of our economy, in turmoil. Many suffering fuel poverty as gas and electricity prices stay high, even when petrol prices have reduced. You know the rest. We could do with some hope.

In the time of John the Baptist, Israel could have done with some hope. You’ve heard it enough times. In their own land, yet feeling like exiles, because they were occupied by Rome. Every now and again, someone popped up to offer hope in terms of an uprising. Every time, Roman legions quelled the rebels and executed them publicly.

Where do you go for hope, when it appear eating a diet not approved by Jamie Oliver and clothes that would give Trinny and Susannah apoplexy. (No bad thing?)

Well, you root yourself in another time when the people of God needed hope. The time addressed in Isaiah 40. Most of God’s people had been deported to Babylon, and had been there a few decades by this point. A handful had been left in Jerusalem.

Then, a prophet in the Isaiah tradition turns up in Babylon, addressing the dispirited exiles and the desolate residents of Jerusalem. Using three metaphors from the physical world around him – wilderness, grass and mountains – he offers God’s hope to those lacking it and most needing it.

And this theme of hope complements what we thought about last week, on the first Sunday of Advent. Then, our theme was waiting. Today, it is hope, which is the content of Christian waiting. Had we read to the end of Isaiah 40, we would have heard – depending on which Bible translation we used – about those who will renew their strength by either ‘waiting’ or ‘hoping’.

So – without more ado – how does the Isaiah prophet help us to hope, using these images of wilderness, grass and mountains?

Wilderness 
Last week, as we considered the theme of waiting, we wondered how we live when it feels like God is absent. Isaiah 40 is bold in response to this: you may feel that God is not here, but God is coming! He gives us a picture that is a bit like the building of a new road (hopefully without the environmental concerns we have about such a project in our society). Prepare God’s way in the wilderness, make a straight highway in the desert, raise the valleys, lower the mountains, and smooth out the rough terrain, and you will see God’s glory (verses 3-5).

So – in a time of God’s apparent absence, the good news is that God is coming. In a time of spiritual darkness, the good news is that you will see God’s glory. Music, surely, to the ears of disillusioned exiles in Babylon, and beaten-down people in Jerusalem. This is a message of comfort. Your punishment is over. Enough is enough (verses 1-2).

We may not know when things will change for the better for Christian witness in our culture, but we can hear similar echoes of hope in Advent. Our waiting and hoping is for Jesus who is called Immanuel, God with us. God is coming. We are not alone. Christ is coming. Christ came. The Father sent the Spirit of Christ. Our sense of aloneness is only apparent. It is not actual.

Of course, we must be careful: proclaiming that in Christ, God is with us, can make us sound like we have a religious superiority complex. This is not a matter of our deserving special rank. It is a matter of grace, God’s undeserved favour to sinners. The Son of Man came to seek and save the lost. It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. Jesus, God with us, came for lost and sick people – including us. Yes, God is with us in Christ. But we hold that knowledge humbly. And as we share it, we do so as one beggar telling another where to find bread.

And the wilderness was specifically to be a place where God’s glory would be seen.  Would God’s glory be seen in raining down fire and brimstone? No. It would be seen as he led a raggle-taggle bag of exiles back home.

Similarly, Advent is a time when we wait in hope for the glory of God. His glory will be seen and sung about in skies over Bethlehem. His glory will be seen, in the words of Bruce Cockburn,

Like a stone on the surface of a still river
Driving the ripples on forever
Redemption rips through the surface of time
In the cry of a tiny babe

It’s a different kind of glory. It’s wilderness glory, a manger at the back of a house in Bethlehem, not a palace in Jerusalem. It’s the glory of God humbling himself into human flesh, one who later as an adult would not grant the wish of two disciples known colloquially as the Sons of Thunder, who wanted to unleash damnation on enemies.

Yes, come to unexpected dry places like a wilderness – like a manger – and find that God is present in strange glory. Come to Broomfield and find him? Why not?

Grass 
When the prophet speaks about the people being like grass, I think he has wilderness grass in mind. It withers and fades in the heat of the wilderness, so when we hear about that happening when the breath of the Lord blows on it (verse 7), I think we’re meant to imagine that the Lord’s breath is hot and intense. The breath of the Lord, the Spirit of God, is not here life-giving but life-taking. The judgment of God had fallen upon the people with the Babylonian invasion and exile; now, like grass in the hot sun, they are withering and fading.

It’s not difficult to find similarities in later generations. In the days before Jesus was born, Israel was withering under oppression from Rome. In our day, we in the western church (especially in Europe) feel like we are withering and fading. What word of hope do we find here? It comes in verse 8:

The grass withers, the flower fades; but the word of our God will stand forever.

Whatever happens to us, the purposes of God are not thwarted. Whether we wither due to divine judgment on our faithlessness or whether it is general oppression or persecution, hear the promise that ‘the word of our God will stand forever’.

A story was told during the time when Russian communism ruled Eastern Europe. Soldiers raided the home of a Christian family and made some arrests. To humiliate them, they threw the family Bible on the floor. But a soldier noticed that one page didn’t burn. It contained the words of Jesus: ‘Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.’ That incident was key in the soldier’s conversion to Christ.

There will be many attempts to destroy God’s word from its place in our society, and some of those attacks will focus on the church. But we are in Advent, the season of hope. The word of the Lord stands forever, and the gates of hell will never prevail against the church of Jesus Christ.

None of this is a reason for complacency, but it is a reason for hope. Therefore, it’s here to boost our faith and fuel our prayers for God to renew his wonders in our day. 

Mountains 
So God is present in his strange glory, and he is speaking and will not be silenced. Those are grounds for hope, but they are not very specific. We need a vantage point. The herald, the preacher (who by the way is female in the text), needs to ‘get up to a high mountain’ to see things as they are and be several hundred feet above contradiction in preaching good news to discouraged people (verse 9).

What good news? That God is victorious over the enemies of his people, that he comes in conquest, with his people as his booty, and with the gentleness of a shepherd caring for ewes and lambs (verses 10-11).

Israel’s hope was the end of captivity in Babylon. The hope in Jesus’ coming was in his resurrection from the dead. Our hope, based on that resurrection, is that of God’s final victory when he appears again, not only to claim his own, but to renew all of creation, with a new heaven and a new earth.

There are always reasons in the world to make us gloomy. At present there is a plethora of reasons. There are also reasons to be pessimistic about the western church. You would think there were few grounds for hope. But when you get up the mountain to see things from God’s perspective, the situation looks different. You see hope in the promises of God, who has acted decisively in the past, who will do so again, and who one day will make all things new.

It’s rather like the old story told by Tony Campolo. People give him all sorts of reasons to be negative about the state of the world and the church. But his standard reply is, “I’ve been reading the Bible. And I’ve peeked to see how it ends. Jesus wins!”

So let the world write us off. Let our friends regard our faith as irrelevant. Let Richard Dawkins describe religion as a virus. But see God’s view from the mountain: Jesus wins. Let that fill us with Advent hope.

And while we’re on the mountain, let us – like the female herald in Isaiah 40 – proclaim it to all who will hear. Let us encourage one another in the church. Don’t be dragged down by the lies and limited perspectives of the world: Jesus wins. 

And let us also proclaim it to a world sorely in need of hope. To people who thought they could trust in money, until the banks blew up. To people who gained their sense of identity from their job, until redundancy hit. To people struck down with disability or chronic or terminal illness, whose lives had been based on the vigour of their bodies. To all these people and many others, proclaim that Jesus wins. It is promised in the actions of God and especially in the Resurrection. We have a hope worth trusting in. Why be afraid? Why be dismayed?

Conclusion 
You may recall I’ve said that my first circuit appointment was in the town of Hertford. There, the Methodists regularly quoted John Wesley’s Journal regarding several of the visits the great man made to the town on his preaching travels. They were fond of quoting one entry in particular, where Wesley was utterly discouraged. It said, ‘Poor desolate Hertford.’ Those words hung like a curse over them.

But you may also remember how I have talked of being involved in ecumenical youth ministry in the town. Somebody gave me the complete set of Wesley’s Journal, and I looked up all the entries on Hertford. They weren’t all doom and gloom. Some were, but one in particular wasn’t. In it, Wesley recounted coming to preach at a school in the town. To cut a long story short, he saw a revival break out among the children.

You can imagine the impact that story had on us as we gathered to pray about youth ministry. Never mind ‘poor desolate Hertford’. There was a heritage of Holy Spirit work among young people in the area. God had not been absent or silent. He had been gloriously present, proclaiming Good News.

So I want to say that the Advent hope is like that. It is time to cast off the darkness. The great Advent text in Isaiah 60 says, ‘Arise, shine, your light has come’. This Advent, might we just dare to believe and to hope in our God?

And might we find that in this hope we have something beyond riches to share with a world, whose own versions of hope have plummeted in value?

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About Dave Faulkner

I'm a British Methodist minister, married with two children. I blog from a moderate evangelical-missional-charismatic perspective, with an interest in the 'missional' approach. My interests include Web 2.0, digital photography, contemporary music and watching football (Tottenham Hotspur) and cricket.

Posted on December 6, 2008, in Books, Culture, Current Affairs, Food and Drink, Religion, Sermons and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. “Let Richard Dawkins describe religion as a virus.”

    Let Gilbert & Sullivan describe Richard Dawkins as The Very Model Of An Atheist Supremacist. 😉

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  2. Let Gilbert & Sullivan describe Richard Dawkins as the very model of an Atheist Supremacist. 😉

    ‘The Atheist Supremacist’s Song’

    aka ‘I Am The Very Model Of An Atheist Supremacist’

    I am the very model of an Atheist Supremacist
    I’m an Intellectual, Evangelical, Godless Evolutionist
    I know the crimes of Christians, and I quote their fights historical
    From Jerusalem to Ireland, in order categorical

    I’m very well acquainted, too, with matters biological
    I understand equivocation, both scientific and theological
    About the “Holey Bible” I’m teeming with a lot o’ news
    With many fearful facts about Christians and the Jews

    With many fearful facts about Christians and the Jews
    With many fearful facts about Christians and the Jews
    With many fearful facts about Christians and those darn Jews

    I’m very good at bigotry and anti-religious insults
    I know the scientific names of beings animalculous
    In short, in matters biological, theological, and religious
    I am the very model of an Atheist Supremacist

    In short, in matters biological, theological, and religious
    He is the very model of an Atheist Supremacist

    I know God’s mythic history, from Osiris to the (Day of Yule)
    I answer to my critics, I’ve a petty taste for ridicule
    I quote in elegiacs all the crimes of Heliogabalus
    In comics I will fight those other gods who are so fabulous

    I can’t tell undoubting Muslims from Bahá’ís or Zoroastrians
    But know the croaking chorus from those corpse-cold Unitarians
    Then I can hum a fugue of which I’ve heard the music’s Rapical
    And whistle at the “fairy tales” of infernal nonsense Biblical

    And whistle at the “fairy tales” of infernal nonsense Biblical
    And whistle at the “fairy tales” of infernal nonsense Biblical
    And whistle at the “fairy tales” of infernal nonsense oh so Biblical

    Then I can write a bashing book of Biblical enormity
    And tell you ev’ry detail of Creationism’s deformity
    In short, in matters biological, Biblical, and religious
    I am the very model of an Atheist Supremacist

    In short, in matters biological, Biblical, and religious
    He is the very model of an Atheist Supremacist

    In fact, when I know what is meant by “Babylon” and “churlish”
    When I can tell at sight a Mormon from a Whirling Dervish
    When such affairs as prayers and “crackers” I’m more wary at
    And when I know precisely what is meant by “Eat your hat”

    When I have learnt what progress has been made in modern funnery
    When I know more of tactlessness than a novice in a nunnery
    In short, when I’ve a smattering of fundamental strategy
    You’ll say a better atheist had never spat at G

    You’ll say a better atheist had never spat at G
    You’ll say a better atheist had never spat at G
    You’ll say a better atheist had never ever spat at G

    For my religious knowledge, though it’s narrowy and shallowy
    Has only been brought down to the early Nineteenth century
    But still, in matters theological, minimal, and religious
    I am the very model of an Atheist Supremacist

    But still, in matters theological, minimal, and religious
    He is the very model of an Atheist Supremacist

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  3. I thought you might enjoy that. 😉

    The original version on The Emerson Avenger blog, which is the URL directly linked to from my name, has embedded hyperlinks in the lyrics that make make some of the seemingly obscure lyrics rather more understandable. I was pleased that it was possible to leave a few of the original G&S lyrics completely intact in light of the subject matter.

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  4. Thanks for the clarification, Robin, and sorry I haven’t been able to respond earlier. Dawkins is a fine scientist, and Christians need to take the science seriously. I haven’t read ‘The God Delusion’ but I imagine it has a mixture of misunderstanding and a few issues where Christians need to respond. The main problem to me seems his almost teenage-style arrogance: ‘if you read this book, you are bound to agree with me’. I don’t mind him arguing his point, but he should surely know from the world of academia that you can’t take that attitude (and nor can Christians). Arguments and hypotheses need testing. He doesn’t seem open to that, in my view.

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